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#1 2010-01-08 04:17:40

WebAndNet.com
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Tinnitus, hyperacusis, and singing techniques

It’s well known that the major cause to tinnitus is loud sounds.   Also, a related condition, hyperacusis (painful amplified hearing), is also affected by loud sound.  Lastly, tinnitus and hyperacusis are often precursors to deafness.

Singing techniques can affect the travel of sound throughout the head, and obviously to the ears as well.  The ways of head resonance amplify these sounds as well.

So, it would seem that singing techniques can affect the degree of affected tinnitus and hyperacusis, and possibly even reduce the likelihood of losing one’s hearing.

Though it is known that some tinnitus and hyperacusis suffers’ singning can cause these illnesses, I didn’t find much research on this topic or how singing techniques can reduce tinnitus or hyperacusis.

Does anyone have suggestions, knowledge, resources for research?


Chen Sun
www.WebAndNet.com, Strategic Web Marketing
www.VocalPosture.com, currently a blog, has unique singing-related content-- posture and voice, vocal structure, ergonomics, Zen and ancient philosophies' relevance to voice.   http://Chen.WebBIZcard.com, a prototype webpage of an invention, is ready for implementation.   This is ideal for any entprepreneur wanting to create a vocalists' or musicians directory.  Thanks

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2010-01-08 04:17:40

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#2 2012-10-26 05:25:07

andwilson
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Re: Tinnitus, hyperacusis, and singing techniques

Tinnitus interferes with sleep and can cause depression and anxiety over time.  Don't wait to get help from tinnitus treatment atlanta.
tinnitus treatment atlanta

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#3 2014-01-16 12:01:55

spiral_out
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Re: Tinnitus, hyperacusis, and singing techniques

"Tinnitus interferes with sleep and can cause depression and anxiety over time.  Don't wait to get help from tinnitus treatment atlanta."

I know this guy is just spamming but for anyone that does have tinnitus, please read. This is what set me free.

Don't buy into the idea that tinnitus causes stress. Your reaction to tinnitus is what causes stress, anxiety, depression, poor sleep, whatever. Our human minds are phenomenally powerful. We are like idiot toddlers behind the wheel of an ancient epic space ship with technology we cannot even begin to understand. The toddler is saying "I don't want tinnitus" and throwing a tantrum in the form of stress and worry. If you let go of that worry through mindfulness you can dissolve those reactions and be at peace with the noise in your head to the point where you forget it is actually there most of the time. I know this from experience and I wish someone told this to me 18 months ago.

I've had terrible tinnitus for around 18 months. In a quiet room it is devastatingly loud. It kept me in a state of perpetual stress. For the first 12 months I tried to run away from it by masking it at all times. I used a loud fan in my bedroom (even in the middle of winter) and I always had headphones on with running water or music playing so I didn't have to hear my tinnitus.

As you can imagine this is a horrible way to live, to be running away from a noise inside your head 24 hours a day. Ugh.

I've seen 2 audiologists, a neurologist and I even travelled to a city 1000km away to see a special neurology/audiology team that specialises in tinnitus. All to no avail. (I also encountered 1 audiologist trying to sell me on an expensive "Neuromonics" treatment that I didn't feel very convinced about)

Things changed when I started getting into meditation and mindfulness about 6 months ago. After getting serious and actually reading the book on Mindfulness that I bought a year prior, it soon dawned on me that my stress was not caused by the sound - it was caused by my reaction to the sound. On a particularly brave day I started meditating in complete silence, letting the ringing be as loud as possible (an idea that would have terrified me earlier). Pretty soon I found some states of mind where I actually forgot about the ringing. I felt at ease and at peace and the sound did not bother me anywhere near as much. It's a different journey for everyone but I know that all people have the power to do this sort of thing, to be able to sit there quietly with your mind and explore your reactions and fears in a meditative state.

These days I am 99% at peace with my tinnitus. I am able to be relaxed and unconcerned about the sound in even the most silent of rooms. It's a miracle for me. And it cost me nothing.

If you are suffering as a result of your tinnitus I urge you to take a look in the mirror and ask 'who am I? .. what am I?' - What do you really know about the human brain? The truth is we don't know ourselves that well. We put a little name on ourselves and we tell ourselves we are so and so from this town and I like ice cream and I like this kind of music but these are all tiny little concepts we carry around. What you're looking at in the mirror is an incredibly powerful organism that most DEFINITELY has the power to be at peace regardless of the circumstances, even loud as (*auto edit*) ringing in your ears. Don't be fooled by the small collection of thoughts that currently rule your life. The human mind can do so much and meditation / mindfulness when practiced seriously can free you from so many poor mind patterns.

Anyway - I didn't come here to post about tinnitus. I just saw that someone was suffering tinnitus and I remembered how fucking horrible it was when I let it rule me and I'd love others to also set themselves free. I hope my story helps someone !

Last edited by spiral_out (2014-01-16 12:26:47)

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#4 2014-01-18 15:41:35

ronws
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Registered: 2010-05-23
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Re: Tinnitus, hyperacusis, and singing techniques

Amen. As I like to say, singing is mental.

For what you say about how to move past tinnitus is also how I view singing. The human body is able to match pitch, the truly technical thing we all must worry about. You just have to let it. And that means letting go of preconceptions of how you think a particular note is to be made to be "valid."

It is also how I have been able to sing songs that are keyed lower than the natural center of my voice. I am nominally a tenor. But I can sing some low notes because I let go of what I think of how another singer is doing them, or of how I think a baritone would be doing that note. I just let go and let my body make the pitch. And someone might say, "how did you do that?" I don't know. It was not technique. You might as well ask me how I eat a steak or walk from the front door to the fridge. However it is my body does it.

Anyway, bravo for sharing your personal experience.

Last edited by ronws (2014-01-18 15:42:36)


"When the daylight is rising up in my eyes ..." - Klaus Meine

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#5 2014-01-19 00:47:18

spiral_out
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Registered: 2014-01-16
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Re: Tinnitus, hyperacusis, and singing techniques

Amen indeed ronws! I know exactly what you mean.

I look at most of learning to sing as reverse engineering. If someone says "Lower your larynx, increase your pharyngeal resonance and support with your diaphragm" I become very confused. I could play around with hours (or months) trying to control specific muscles and get nowhere. But funnily if i put on an Arnold Schwarzenegger voice, I am doing exactly that! Like a pro! So when I work on my deep voice I literally start by doing an Arnie voice and then pay attention to how my body has shifted to accommodate for that. I notice "wow, I am intuitively engaging my breathing related muscles differently, I'm intuitively creating a deep relaxed resonance in my throat and pharynx". It's nuts. I feel like it is an epic shortcut to becoming a great singer. Other accents reveal other coordinations for me. I guess it's no different to going for a "dopey" voice to achieve a low larynx. When I slip into a "character" like the Dopey voice guy or Arnie, or Mrs Doubtfire (low head voice) and so on it gives me instant access to these coordinations that I would otherwise be searching for through direct control of my muscles (and probably failing at).

I am fairly new to singing but I have been a professional guitarist for many years. I am lucky to have a pretty good understanding how muscle memory works for myself. One thing I like to do is let my hand represent pitch. If I lift my hand high, my pitch is high. If I lower my hand, my pitch lowers. If I do this for a few minutes I then find that I can just focus purely on my hand so it's like my pitch is connected to my hand. I no longer have to have any concept of pitch in my vocal folds or throat or anywhere and I can let go of all tension around my throat. I just lift my hand up and down while letting my throat relax and the pitch changes for me. These kinds of tricks work wonders for me. I almost feel nauseous when I read people giving long descriptions of muscle coordinations. Maybe it works for them - I don't know. I think there's more ability in ourselves than our little minds can understand and it's more about learning to unlock those moments consistently than training ourselves to learn a new skill.

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#6 2014-01-24 12:15:44

spiral_out
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Registered: 2014-01-16
Posts: 7
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Re: Tinnitus, hyperacusis, and singing techniques

CunoDante wrote:

spiral_out wrote:

Things changed when I started getting into meditation and mindfulness about 6 months ago. After getting serious and actually reading the book on Mindfulness that I bought a year prior, it soon dawned on me that my stress was not caused by the sound - it was caused by my reaction to the sound. On a particularly brave day I started meditating in complete silence, letting the ringing be as loud as possible (an idea that would have terrified me earlier). Pretty soon I found some states of mind where I actually forgot about the ringing. I felt at ease and at peace and the sound did not bother me anywhere near as much. It's a different journey for everyone but I know that all people have the power to do this sort of thing, to be able to sit there quietly with your mind and explore your reactions and fears in a meditative state.

I can actually attest to this from my own experience, as I've used it with my own tinnitus. The basic premise was the same, but I executed it a little differently. I noticed a long time ago that whenever I cover my ears or even just lay my ear on a pillow, the sound of the tinnitus greatly increases. Thus, for a long time, I made sure I avoided anything that increased the sound. Well, one day by accident, I was trying to do a meditation where I would block out all of my senses. I was essentially trying to simulate meditating in a dark, sound proof room as efficiently as I could. So I blindfolded myself and covered my ears with my hands. As soon as I did this, the sound of the tinnitus went through the roof as did my stress levels. I intentionally tried to make it louder at this point, so that I could be at peace with the sound -- as you said, changing your personal reaction to the sound. After around 10 minutes of meditating like this, the sound became a non-bother to me and I became much more relaxed. Then after taking off the blindfold and uncovering my ears, the sound still was much less of a bother than normal.

spiral_out wrote:

If someone says "Lower your larynx, increase your pharyngeal resonance and support with your diaphragm" I become very confused. I could play around with hours (or months) trying to control specific muscles and get nowhere. But funnily if i put on an Arnold Schwarzenegger voice, I am doing exactly that! Like a pro! So when I work on my deep voice I literally start by doing an Arnie voice and then pay attention to how my body has shifted to accommodate for that.

If you have a good ear for ACCURATELY imitating others, then this approach can work very well for you. But a lot of people don't have that kind of ear, so they end up imitating the sound incorrectly and this engaging the improper musculature. But if you have found success with then approach, then stick with it! We all have to find what works for each of us.

~~Dante~~

Wow man! I'm so glad to hear of your similar tinnitus story. Good on you! That really makes me happy. I hope many others can figure this out as well.

As for the imitating voices thing, I totally agree. It's only really applicable to those who have a talent for doing impersonations. However I do believe most of us would discover talents within ourselves if we truly closed our eyes and played around with our voice in different ways.

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#7 2014-01-25 15:49:23

ronws
TMV Forum Member
Registered: 2010-05-23
Posts: 11731
Reputation :   139 

Re: Tinnitus, hyperacusis, and singing techniques

spiral_out wrote:

Amen indeed ronws! I know exactly what you mean.

I look at most of learning to sing as reverse engineering. If someone says "Lower your larynx, increase your pharyngeal resonance and support with your diaphragm" I become very confused. I could play around with hours (or months) trying to control specific muscles and get nowhere. But funnily if i put on an Arnold Schwarzenegger voice, I am doing exactly that! Like a pro! So when I work on my deep voice I literally start by doing an Arnie voice and then pay attention to how my body has shifted to accommodate for that. I notice "wow, I am intuitively engaging my breathing related muscles differently, I'm intuitively creating a deep relaxed resonance in my throat and pharynx". It's nuts. I feel like it is an epic shortcut to becoming a great singer. Other accents reveal other coordinations for me. I guess it's no different to going for a "dopey" voice to achieve a low larynx. When I slip into a "character" like the Dopey voice guy or Arnie, or Mrs Doubtfire (low head voice) and so on it gives me instant access to these coordinations that I would otherwise be searching for through direct control of my muscles (and probably failing at).

I am fairly new to singing but I have been a professional guitarist for many years. I am lucky to have a pretty good understanding how muscle memory works for myself. One thing I like to do is let my hand represent pitch. If I lift my hand high, my pitch is high. If I lower my hand, my pitch lowers. If I do this for a few minutes I then find that I can just focus purely on my hand so it's like my pitch is connected to my hand. I no longer have to have any concept of pitch in my vocal folds or throat or anywhere and I can let go of all tension around my throat. I just lift my hand up and down while letting my throat relax and the pitch changes for me. These kinds of tricks work wonders for me. I almost feel nauseous when I read people giving long descriptions of muscle coordinations. Maybe it works for them - I don't know. I think there's more ability in ourselves than our little minds can understand and it's more about learning to unlock those moments consistently than training ourselves to learn a new skill.

Awesome. I can also do an "Arnold" impersonation. "Run to the choppah! Now!" "Sulley, remember I told that you that I would kill you last because I like you?"
"Yes! You did say that!"
"I lied."
"Ahhh ...."
"What happend to Sulley?"
"I had to let him go."

Granted, my voice range is more like that of Rae Dawn Chong,  but I can do the accent and as much boom as my voice can stand.

Fellow member MDEW talks about using "funny" voices and those are just as valuable for voice training as worrying about whuch muscles are doing what. Then, again, I am not a singing expert or teacher. I just care about the results and whether I can do them over the span of a lifetime. That probably means I am lazy.
:lol:


"When the daylight is rising up in my eyes ..." - Klaus Meine

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