TMV Partners

You are not logged in.


Announcement

GO HERE: www.TheModernVocalistWorld.com

ATTENTION TMV WORLD FORUM MEMBERS! YOU NEED TO GO LOGIN AND/OR REGISTER AT THE NEW AND IMPROVED TMV WORLD FORUM SYSTEM.



CLICK THIS LINK TO GO TO THE NEW FORUM. WHEN YOU ARRIVE AT THE NEW FORUM, LOGIN OR REGISTER AND THEN CLICK ON "GETTING STARTED". ALL OF THE POSTS AND TOPICS HAVE BEEN MIGRATED OVER AND EXISTING MEMBERS WILL BE LINKED BACK TO ALL THEIR POSTS IN THE NEW SYSTEM AFTER YOU LOGIN.

www.TheModernVocalistWorld.com

IF YOU ARE A NEW VISITOR THAT JUST JOINED US, YOU ARE INVITED TO COME OVER TO OUR NEW FORUM SYSTEM. CLICK THIS LINK TO GO THERE AND REGISTER.

www.TheModernVocalistWorld.com

Adverts

#1 2014-11-29 09:09:48

Jarom
TMV Forum Member
Registered: 2014-08-16
Posts: 31
Reputation :   

Spending to much time on extreme notes

Many peoples voices and as well as my own tend to spend so much time on extreme highs and extreme lows that the easy C4 and A3 notes start to feel awkward. I usually have to remind my self to not treat the easy notes like the extreme notes. Anyone else have this problem?

Offline

 

2014-11-29 09:09:48

AdBot
Advertisements

#2 2014-11-29 09:24:19

Owen Korzec
TMV Forum Member
Registered: 2011-09-18
Posts: 3109
Reputation :   78 
Website

Re: Spending to much time on extreme notes

Jarom wrote:

Many peoples voices and as well as my own tend to spend so much time on extreme highs and extreme lows that the easy C4 and A3 notes start to feel awkward. I usually have to remind my self to not treat the easy notes like the extreme notes. Anyone else have this problem?

Practice a lot of songs that you would be able to perform rain or shine, or at least have significant sections in them with that level of ease. And then that easy range will get very developed.

The goal is to make A3-C4 ish (really, anywhere from around F3-E4 for that matter) feel like speaking with an exclamation point or question mark - where your voice goes up in pitch to serve expressive purpose but you don't raise the volume like yelling all the way across the house.

Last edited by Owen Korzec (2014-11-29 09:26:25)

Offline

 

#3 2014-11-30 13:55:35

Clint Torres
TMV Forum Member
From: Where the sun don't shine
Registered: 2014-10-03
Posts: 83
Reputation :   

Re: Spending to much time on extreme notes

Specificity in training.  It's like anything else.  There are people who believe that by practicing the extreme, anything less automatically gets better.   Like a sport or activity that requires flexibility. Maybe someone stretches their legs really extreme trying to easily get their foot to point straight at the ceiling while kicking. They  think that if they can do that then getting a good kick mid level will be easier and they can now kick that soccer ball for miles. Not so.  There are different muscles involved and/they are used differently in both instances.  Train what you are planning to use and train it how you will use it.

Offline

 

#4 2014-11-30 14:17:43

FelipeCarvalho
TMV Forum Member
From: Brasil
Registered: 2011-07-28
Posts: 2889
Reputation :   61 
Website

Re: Spending to much time on extreme notes

Train what you are planning to use and train it how you will use it.

That :)

Offline

 

#5 2014-11-30 15:29:00

ronws
TMV Forum Member
Registered: 2010-05-23
Posts: 11731
Reputation :   139 

Re: Spending to much time on extreme notes

Jarom wrote:

Many peoples voices and as well as my own tend to spend so much time on extreme highs and extreme lows that the easy C4 and A3 notes start to feel awkward. I usually have to remind my self to not treat the easy notes like the extreme notes. Anyone else have this problem?

I find it best, for me, to treat the whole voice as the same. In a sense, what I have done for extremes of range help me to achieve control that I should carry through the middle of the range. In a sense, there are no easy notes, just as there are no hard notes.

To put it another way, breath support and management are just as important in the low and "easy" part of the range, near where you would normally speak, as it is important at the highest note you can make.

And I think a number of people, including those who have diligently studied singing for some time may also think that the upper 3rd octave, for example, is easy. A number of males make speak comfortably somewhere betwee G2 and E3, for example. But that does not mean you can disengage singing support, unless the lyrics specifically call for speaking, such as the poetry that ends "Nights in White Satin" by the Moody Blues. Even then, the lyric is spoken with a cadence that still seems to match the meter of the music.

And I or anyone else could easily go off-pitch in the middle of the range as we might at the extreme ends. Here, in this forum, almost no one, with the exception of myself and Adoney have sought to go to the very lowest sounds we can make. Everyone else seems more interested in making things above, say B4 more managable and repeatable. And that is all well and good. I just think, as you are suggesting, that attention should be paid to the entire range.

Of the resources I have used on singing, it is thought better to manage the passagio(s) and make supple the main center of what you want to sing than to worry on extreme notes. Though it's okay to check extreme notes a few times a week to make sure you still have them.

But it also helps to understand the center of your voice. One could take great wisdom from the words of Mike Tramp from White Lion.

It is also okay to realize that you will make some adjustments at difference parts of the range even if the whole affect is one voice. That is what I do. Some have noted that I seem to have one voice from bottom to top, which I take as a compliment. And it is from allowing the voice to adjust. Because what you hear is an auditory effect.

Last edited by ronws (2014-11-30 15:30:14)


"When the daylight is rising up in my eyes ..." - Klaus Meine

Offline

 
OTHER TMV WEB SITES: TMV RECOMMENDS: TMV RECOMMENDS: TMV RECOMMENDS:

Adverts

Board footer

Powered by FluxBB
Hosted by PunBB-Hosting