TMV Partners

You are not logged in.


Announcement

GO HERE: www.TheModernVocalistWorld.com

ATTENTION TMV WORLD FORUM MEMBERS! YOU NEED TO GO LOGIN AND/OR REGISTER AT THE NEW AND IMPROVED TMV WORLD FORUM SYSTEM.



CLICK THIS LINK TO GO TO THE NEW FORUM. WHEN YOU ARRIVE AT THE NEW FORUM, LOGIN OR REGISTER AND THEN CLICK ON "GETTING STARTED". ALL OF THE POSTS AND TOPICS HAVE BEEN MIGRATED OVER AND EXISTING MEMBERS WILL BE LINKED BACK TO ALL THEIR POSTS IN THE NEW SYSTEM AFTER YOU LOGIN.

www.TheModernVocalistWorld.com

IF YOU ARE A NEW VISITOR THAT JUST JOINED US, YOU ARE INVITED TO COME OVER TO OUR NEW FORUM SYSTEM. CLICK THIS LINK TO GO THERE AND REGISTER.

www.TheModernVocalistWorld.com

Adverts

#1 2013-02-19 20:00:00

Owen Korzec
TMV Forum Member
Registered: 2011-09-18
Posts: 3109
Reputation :   78 
Website

Questions about extending low range

I've neglected it for so long, thinking i'd never have a use for it. But now I do...

Recently I had an idea to orchestrate one of my original songs in a multi-tracked a capella version, ala Steve Fraser's recordings if you've heard them.

I've work the arrangement around my range to an extent, but I just want to have this Eb2 in the bass part at one point and if I've used my voice much in a higher or even medium register that day, that note just disappears. My lowest reliable note is F2.

So my question is, how much and how quickly can the low range be extended? And does doing so compromise the high range? It certainly seems like working on the high range has compromised my low range - Eb2 used to be a pretty reliable note for me and now it's always a stretch...but could it just be cause I've neglected the low range?

As far as I know, expanding the low range is mostly a matter of lowering the larynx and maintaining fold closure, any other tricks you'd suggest to increase the low range?

Offline

 

2013-02-19 20:00:00

AdBot
Advertisements

#2 2013-02-19 21:05:18

JensTP
TMV Forum Member
Registered: 2010-12-21
Posts: 52
Reputation :   

Re: Questions about extending low range

I realise I'm not answering the question, but just record the part in the morning. That should give you an extra wholenote or so with some resonance to boot.

Others will respond properly but the general consensus seems to be relax as much as possibly, use support to find the right amount of air and twang like an *auto editer*. If the note is below your current range find a fry configuration repeat the aforementioned steps until it solidifies.

My personal experience with E2 being the usual low note for me (weak as it is) is that my folds and resonance profile change too much from day to day to make those low notes reliable without working consistently on coordination. Plus my larynx looks really weird at the bottom of modal voice (like it retracts in the throat), which I find freaky.

Offline

 

#3 2013-02-19 22:39:31

Owen Korzec
TMV Forum Member
Registered: 2011-09-18
Posts: 3109
Reputation :   78 
Website

Re: Questions about extending low range

Record it in the morning...ha...that's exactly what I would do and probably will do. But I'm trying to get away from that kind of cheating. I might as well incorporate those extra notes into my reliable performance range if I can, because, why not.

It seems like my biggest problem is I'm losing closure down there...anybody know some exercises to work on that in the low range?

Offline

 

#4 2013-02-19 23:20:08

Jens
TMV Forum Member
Registered: 2009-01-07
Posts: 1461
Reputation :   36 

Re: Questions about extending low range

Just spend time down there, i promise there would be alot more guys with deeper voices if it would get exercised as much as the middle and topvoice

Offline

 

#5 2013-02-20 02:31:44

geno
TMV Forum Member
Registered: 2009-10-30
Posts: 2059
Reputation :   53 

Re: Questions about extending low range

Owen I've struggled with low range too, but have gotten better lately.  I modified my exercises (scales or arpeggios) by starting on a note an octave higher than the starting note, and then sliding down to the first note of the exercise.  That way I'm fully connected in my middle range and keep that connection as I slide down to begin the exercise.

And then in the recent past I bought Per Bristows "the singing zone" program.  He sings very low and deep but also very high.  The start of his program is low notes.  He demonstrates a very relaxed approach - not forcing anything.  He basically says if you start to force something, your body will compensate and unwanted tensions will creep in.  After doing some of his low note exercises I can get lower and more connected than what I previously was doing.  And it only took a few days.

Offline

 

#6 2013-02-20 10:05:55

benny82
TMV Forum Member
From: Germany
Registered: 2012-12-02
Posts: 645
Reputation :   17 

Re: Questions about extending low range

Imo the lower range is not as extendable as the higher range. This doesn't mean you can't make sounds that low, but if you do notes that are too low for your voice type, you will lose 'the ring', i.e. the brighter overtones (or the 'forward placement') in your sound. Another thing that often happens when doing notes too low for your voice type is that you sound 'sob-like', because you drop your larynx too much.

That said, to find your lower limit is quite similar to the upper limit. Try to cling on compression and overtones (aka 'twang'). When you can't keep up twang on your low notes, you have basically found your limit. Going lower will make you sound inconsistent or just not loud enough.

Offline

 

#7 2013-02-21 02:18:17

ronws
TMV Forum Member
Registered: 2010-05-23
Posts: 11731
Reputation :   139 

Re: Questions about extending low range

benny82 wrote:

Imo the lower range is not as extendable as the higher range. This doesn't mean you can't make sounds that low, but if you do notes that are too low for your voice type, you will lose 'the ring', i.e. the brighter overtones (or the 'forward placement') in your sound. Another thing that often happens when doing notes too low for your voice type is that you sound 'sob-like', because you drop your larynx too much.

That said, to find your lower limit is quite similar to the upper limit. Try to cling on compression and overtones (aka 'twang'). When you can't keep up twang on your low notes, you have basically found your limit. Going lower will make you sound inconsistent or just not loud enough.

I agree with you, Benny, though I may be the only one.


"When the daylight is rising up in my eyes ..." - Klaus Meine

Offline

 

#8 2013-02-21 07:33:20

JensTP
TMV Forum Member
Registered: 2010-12-21
Posts: 52
Reputation :   

Re: Questions about extending low range

ronws wrote:

benny82 wrote:

Imo the lower range is not as extendable as the higher range. This doesn't mean you can't make sounds that low, but if you do notes that are too low for your voice type, you will lose 'the ring', i.e. the brighter overtones (or the 'forward placement') in your sound. Another thing that often happens when doing notes too low for your voice type is that you sound 'sob-like', because you drop your larynx too much.

That said, to find your lower limit is quite similar to the upper limit. Try to cling on compression and overtones (aka 'twang'). When you can't keep up twang on your low notes, you have basically found your limit. Going lower will make you sound inconsistent or just not loud enough.

I agree with you, Benny, though I may be the only one.

Until I find a magical mode that allows me to sing bass I also agree :)

But there's the usual difference of projection. Everyone has a lower limit for stage volume where the ring disappears and lower notes muffle. Owen is talking about microphone volume here and then it's a different ball game, where volumen and tonal quality requirements are lowered (the prior obviously moreso than the latter). Plenty of us baritone-ish singers want to learn how to sing the best Eb2's we can knowing full well it'll never pass for a bass.

Offline

 

#9 2013-02-22 00:56:51

ronws
TMV Forum Member
Registered: 2010-05-23
Posts: 11731
Reputation :   139 

Re: Questions about extending low range

I hear you, JensTP. C3 is about the lowest note I can do with good acoustic volume. I have managed a few notes below that, if I am right up on the mic because my volume is greatly reduced. And I have been more concerned with the C3 to C6 region. There's not a lot of songs that I like that are outside of that range.

So, I'm not going to worry too much about such a low end for just a few songs. Though I admire the natural ability in others.


"When the daylight is rising up in my eyes ..." - Klaus Meine

Offline

 
OTHER TMV WEB SITES: TMV RECOMMENDS: TMV RECOMMENDS: TMV RECOMMENDS:

Adverts

Board footer

Powered by FluxBB
Hosted by PunBB-Hosting