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#1 2010-10-03 20:43:09

basil
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From: Crystal Lake, IL
Registered: 2010-07-11
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Vocal Range Test

Hi,

I really don't what my vocal range is and was wondering if anyone has a good recorded way of testing vocal range?


Thanks in advance
Mike Basil

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#2 2010-10-03 20:56:41

Douglas
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Re: Vocal Range Test

Hi Basil,

There are many ways to do it.  I assume you might be looking for a program that will help you?  If so, there is a program that I have been using lately called Sing and See, and it will tell you the note you are singing and also give you a real time voice spectragram.  The program itself is not cheap but there is a thirty day trial which should be long enough to see what the highest and lowest notes are that you can sing.

You can find it at: http://www.singandsee.com/index.php?lin … snum=1.2.8

I hope this is helpful.

Doug

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#3 2010-10-03 21:11:30

Douglas
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Re: Vocal Range Test

Hi again Basil,

Actually I downloaded the program that I posted about from tucows, as a time limted trial but I can't find it now.  Perhaps they took it down?  There is another program that is on tucows that is more like a Karaoke program but you can use it to see how high and low you can sing as well.  It isn't as slick as sing & see though.  And there are likely many others you can get too.

http://www.tucows.com/preview/512776/Si … ?q=singing

I hope this helps some.

Doug

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#4 2010-10-04 15:14:40

basil
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From: Crystal Lake, IL
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Re: Vocal Range Test

Hi Douglas,

I'll check out the program.    I was thinking low tech....like recorded piano scales that indicate vocal ranges

Thanks
Mike

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#5 2010-10-18 18:40:01

Douglas
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Re: Vocal Range Test

Hi Mike,

Vocal fach, is a system that origniated with German Opera I believe.  Lots goes into it other than being able to sing specific notes.  If you are interested in opera or classical voice some of the forum members from a classical tradition will likely be able to help you or point you in the right direction about how you discover what fach would fit you best.

I would suggest that it may not matter so much if you are not interested in classical singing, and that many rock singers have very broad ranges.  And though for certain styles being able to sing high is helpful, there is no restriction on your having to be a "tenor" to do it.

Please let everyone know what your goal is and likely a classical voice expert will chime in!

Doug

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#6 2010-10-22 13:36:17

basil
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From: Crystal Lake, IL
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Re: Vocal Range Test

Hi Doug,
My goal is to measure my current vocal range so I know where I started before training.
Than I want to use some vocal exercise training and measure my vocal range to chart any resuilts.   

Currently I don't even know what my range is .....am I tenor or baritone?    I'm a self taught vocalist and there many rock songs I can sing well,but than there are many I can't because I can't hit the high notes.

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#7 2010-10-22 14:01:17

Douglas
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Re: Vocal Range Test

Hi Basil,

I don't think there is a standard definition for the ranges but in opera C5 (that is one octave above middle C)seems to be the highest note that tenors need to be able to perform (which may be very different from the highest note they can hit) with something around A2 being the lowest note in a relatively standard tenor repertoire, or so I have read.  Some tenors sing much higher though. (I am not a classical singer or even a classical student so I hope others will correct me if I got anything wrong.)

In other styles like musical theater some roles call for G5 at the upper end.  And in rock singing there are a fair number of songs with G5s in them.

One issue though is that even if you can sing G5 some schools of thought might say that you still could be a baritone rather than a tenor because it isnt the range that determins what you are.

So I guess the biggest point that I want to get across is that range is not the same as vocal fach, and vocal fach is not very important for rock singing.  People who might be able to sing well in the baritone and bass range, can also learn to sing high, and some of them have made a lot of money doing it (W. Axel Rose for example).  So if you were a baritone it would not mean that you couldn't sing G5.

As another example, there is a guy in this forum named Jens who is a baritone but he can sing D6 (that is the D above soprano high C) in what some would call head voice, or others would call metal like neutral, and he can sing C8 using a register some call whistle.  He is around and is very willing to talk to people about singing high.  My point in mentioning him is that, although Jens has a gift for singing really high, it is likely possible for most guys to sing much higher than might be expected by looking at the opera performance ranges for tenors.

I hope that helps a little anyway.

Doug

Last edited by Douglas (2010-10-22 14:25:31)

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#8 2010-10-22 18:48:49

basil
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From: Crystal Lake, IL
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Re: Vocal Range Test

Hi Douglas,
I was thinking more like mp3 recorded piano scales
"Do ray me fa so la te do" scales that start two octives below middle C and go two octives above middle C or something like that.

This way I'll know what I can sing currently and than I'll be able to measure improvements

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#9 2010-10-23 00:54:26

Douglas
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Re: Vocal Range Test

Hi Basil,

Here are some youtube scales, that show the keyboard so you can tell what notes are being played (they have the Cs labled).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RqVzi36AlNA

Doug

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#10 2010-10-23 16:17:57

basil
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From: Crystal Lake, IL
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Re: Vocal Range Test

Hi Doug,

I never thought YouTube would have something like this.

Thanks :)

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#11 2010-10-24 17:25:46

Joanna
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Re: Vocal Range Test

Hi Basil:
FYI from the science side:  state-of-art measurement of range is called "Voice Range Profile". It doesn't just measure pitch, but the amplitude (intensity) range one is able to produce at each pitch. This is considered a better absolute measure of voice physiology & technique. It gets harder to be soft at the high end, harder to be loud at the very low end.

The exact procedure is not publicly available for free, but you could set up an approximation using sound level meter, a way to keep constant distance from mouth to meter, and pitch reference; or software that measures both loudness & pitch, again keeping the same distance to mic all the time. You'd set up a graph with pitch on horizontal axis & dB on vertical, (or put numbers into Excel & make a graphic chart in the software.)

Measure your loudest & softest at a sample of pitches through range. Research form goes every half-step but that can take forever; testing or sampling at thirds or 1/2 octaves is roughly accurate.

Sorry if this is all more geeky than you want. CONCEPT is that pure pitch range is not a true picture of your capacity. Ideally one also develops a useful expressive range of productions across that pitch range. Again, less important for rockers, but you don't scream it out max ALL the time, right?

And if you measure every few months, say, and notice that the high notes are still there but getting more restricted (can only reach them if you blast really loud), it means cords are less healthy.

just google "voice range profile" & see what you find.
cheers - 
Joanna

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#12 2010-10-31 22:10:46

sfpianist
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Re: Vocal Range Test

Joanna,
That was a good reply.  It doesn't matter if someone can reach down to E2, or as high as E6.  It's the usability and sound of the vocal range that counts.  If a singer has a strong, well balanced two octave range and is singing Pop, that's all they need.  I suppose bragging rights count for something for certain people, but to me, if I can sing down to G2 all the way up to C5 clearly, strong both loud or soft, that's all I need.

Denis

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#13 2010-11-01 00:21:21

ronws
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Registered: 2010-05-23
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Re: Vocal Range Test

I had read once that a singer could be classified by the lowest usable note. That is, there is not any astounding examples of someone adding lower notes to their range but plenty of people adding high notes to their range. However, I value Steven's definition, which is echoed in some of the posts here. The strongest area you have that has the greatest control of volume and tone is what I would consider your nominal range though techniques are available to expand one's range. So, even though I can do some baritone, my strongest area is tenor, in my opinion, never having been classified by any teacher or system. Most of the stuff I sing is in tenor and most of it is quite easy for me, at least when I am doing things right.:)


"T - N - T I'm dynamite - and I'll win the fight!" - Bon Scott

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#14 2010-11-13 12:29:50

Vic
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From: San Francisco, CA
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Re: Vocal Range Test

basil,

Your voice type (e.g. bass, baritone, tenor, etc.) is traditionally defined by where the breaks in your voice occur. 

A bass will typically feel the need to make the first "aggiustamento" or adjustment at about A to B below middle C, a baritone at about middle C to D above middle C and a tenor at about E.

If you sing a C major scale and find yourself wanting to switch to falsetto at about C, you're probably a baritone. 

Below - A bass; Above - A tenor.


This should also help you determine the type of rep to sing and teacher to find as you typically want to learn from somebody who has your voice type and uses it effectively!

Hope this helps.


Good Vibes~
Vic


Graduate UNF, Classical Voice, Instructor at the Florida Conservatory of Music, Operatic Baritone

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